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The mighty peanut worm won me 5th place in a contest - but what's a peanut worm?

The UC Berkeley Molecular Image Core had its first annual image contest. The entries are amazing! I submitted a cross section of a peanut worm taken with our new Zeiss slide scanner and won 5th place! Very cool!

But what's a peanut worm? Nope, not a worm that eats peanuts. Not even one that makes its home on peanut plants... Sipunculid worms live in shallow ocean waters and make their homes by burrowing into sand or twisting into rocks. Their mouths are ringed with tentacles that move food into their body cavity for digestion. They can regenerate, heal quickly and reproduce by binary fission (though some do release gametes into the water for fertilizing). They apparently look like shelled peanuts. I don't see it, but I guess "tube worm" was already taken!

Here are all the entries:

And the winners:

And my lil peanut worm submission!

 Such pretty guts! mk2015

Such pretty guts! mk2015


New-to-me methods... "decorating" mRNA with fluorescence!

4 channel... North America?